It Works for Me: Similes and Metaphors

I like to use lots of similes and metaphors as well as adjectives and adverbs to create pictures in peoples minds.
Similes compare AS …. AS or LIKE.
As big as a house; or as small as a mouse; are similes.
The car rocketed forward; or Her face turned to thunder; are metaphors

Metaphors are conceptual. You create them yourself.
For instance “big saucer eyes” when young Ben and Margo face the wolves in RHAMIN for the first time. That is a conceptual metaphor. By picturing one thing in your mind you get an image of what the author really wants to portray.
EXAMPLES from THE LAST SPELL:
They were all listening for the whisper of the wind to return. But the air remained as still as a dead man’s breath; The first sentence contains the metaphor. The second contains the simile.
The sun pushed itself up into the sky, as it gazed down at its twin in the glassy sea.
OR the glassy surface of the sea began to stir, rippled a thousand times by the movement of the vessel, and stroked gently by the welcome breeze.
OR Wide eyed, and with a look of anger that would have subdued a clap of thunder, he cast his eyes wildly about the hold.

ADVERBS, ADJECTIVES and THREE

I Use plenty of adjectives and adverbs. I describe my nouns and my verbs (actions). THREE is quite an important number in this case. For some reason, the human psychology seems to be drawn (in many cases) by a description with not one, not two, but three descriptive words. This is a proven fact and has been used by speech writers for some very prominent politicians to give emphasis to their words. Example: the big, soft couch and the big, soft, floppy couch. And I went through a long, dark tunnel and I went through a long, dark, eerie tunnel.
This might seem insignificant at first glance. Three might not be your lucky number. But it works for me.

BUT I don’t use lots of descriptive words in every consecutive sentence. That makes the story harder to read and flowery.
I use short sentences to give part of the story sharp emphasis.
I use longer sentences to prevent the reader getting the impression that the text is just a list of events like a summary of historical occurrences.